On Acceptance

 Solitude

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

” the first time I was  introduced to Edward, we were both drunk at a party. He introduced himself as Rama and had shockingly pink hair. Over the months, we grew close.

The first time i was properly introduced to Edward, we sat on a public bench for hours. we spoke lots, because there was lots to talk about but after a while he pulled out his notebook, and grew quiet. That was a beautiful moment to observe, the silence of a person sitting next to you. I learned, that day, that Edward is capable of experiencing moments within himself, and only for himself. It was one of the defining moments in our friendship. ”

Transforming

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

” A few weeks ago Edward called me, with an unsteadiness in his voice. He had been getting testosterone shots for almost seven weeks, and was beginning to feel like things were moving to quickly. He told me he was not ready for his voice to change yet or to develop facial hair, having grown comfortable in the body he inhabited for what it was. I smiled across the line, and told him I was happy to support him in any decision he made. The thing is, society forces us to believe we need to identify with a specific gender or status quo to “legitimatize” our existence. The best we can hope for is that over time, we grow to love who we are for who we are. Edward still uses male pronouns, but is taking time now to love himself like we all should, with pride and acceptance”

Being 

” This documentary series has been more than simply a school project to me, I’ve developed a life long relationship with a person who has taught me more about identity and self-awareness than i could have ever asked for. Edward, this is for you. For others to learn from you, and realize that we are, meant to be, exactly the way we want. It is no ones place to tell us differently. Thank you for teaching me that.”